Call (716) 373-4467
29Dec

Moving Your Office Next Year? DON’T… Until You Read This First

 

Moving is always a big pain for those involved, but it doesn’t have to be a horrific, expensive experience. The number one complaint from someone who’s experienced a “bad” move is, “I didn’t know I needed to…” followed closely by “I completely forgot that…” In other words, it’s what you don’t do that makes the move a disaster.

To make your move easy and effortless, here are the 4 most common mistakes to avoid:

Mistake #1 – Not Using A Checklist

This may seem like a no-brainer to those who manage projects, but project management may not be a forte of someone place in charge of your move. Even those who use a list typically fail to make the list detailed enough.

Mistake #2 – Trying to Save Money By Moving Your Own Computer Network

Don’t ask your staff to disconnect, move and reconnect computers, phones and other devices just to save a few bucks. You’ll frustrate them and end up with phones ringing at the wrong extension, lost cables, and workstations that get dropped rendering them useless. You don’t want to let the movers do this job either; they may be great at moving furniture, but a network is a lot more sophisticated and sensitive. Be smart and hire an IT pro to pack!

Mistake #3 – Not Hiring The RIGHT IT Firm To Move Your Network

Make sure you know what to look for when outsourcing the move. A few things to look for would include references from other clients, proof of insurance, a service level guarantee limiting the amount of time you are down, and a professional, organized approach to quoting the move. A real pro will insist on visiting your current location as well as your new location to conduct a detailed site survey. NEVER hire anyone who wants to quote moving your network over the phone. Additionally, look for an IT company that will apply the charges for conducting your site survey against the total cost of the move if you choose.

Mistake #4 – Not Giving Your Phone, Internet And Cable Vendors Enough Advance

80% of unexpected communications, blackouts and cost overruns on network moves are caused by failure to properly plan voice, data and electrical installation in advance. Just because the prior tenant had computers and telephones is no guarantee that the cabling is suitable for your phones and your computer network. Advance planning will help you avoid emergency rush fees or band aid fixes to make things work.

Internet and telephone connections require as much as six weeks advance notice to be installed, tested and ready the day you move in.

And if you are building a new office, don’t leave it up to the builder to decide how many power outlets, network and phone connections you will need. Remember, changes and additions after the walls are up are at your expense. With printer, scanners, faxes, and other technologies connecting directly to the network these days, the rule of thumb of one electrical outlet, one phone and one network connection per employee is woefully outdated.

If you are planning on moving this year, contact us at 716-373-4467 or info@databranch.com to connect with our experts and map out your move to minimize costs and downtime!

comments powered by Disqus
2FA AI APC backup Breaches business continuity Business Email Compromise BYOD client of the month cloud computing computer services computer support computer upgrade Computer Upgrades Control Chief covid-19 CryptoLocker CryptoWall Cyber Attacks cyber criminal cyberattack cybercrime cybersecurity Cybersecurity Training Dark Web Monitoring Dark web scan Data Breaches data protection Data-Loss Prevention Databranch Databranch Comprehensive Care databranch cto databranch employees Device Security Discounts doug wilson dura-bilt email migration email security End of Support Exchange Online Facebook field technician Hackers Hardware Refresh heat-induced server crash holiday computer tips holiday internet tips How Long Do I have to Upgrade my Windows 7 Computers? i.t. service provider ID Agent Information Technology Internet Security IT Compliance IT Outsourcing IT Security IT Services J.P. Morgan local admin privileges malware managed service managed service provider managed services Microsoft Microsoft End of Support Microsoft Office Microsoft Patching Microsoft Support Microsoft Telephone Scam mike wilson mobile device security Multi-Factor Authentication Network Infrastructure Office 2013 Office 365 old UPS password management Password Manager password security Passwords PC Performance Penn-Troy Manufacturing Personal Data phishing Phishing Attacks Power Failure productivity Professional Tune-Up proper server environment Ransomware remote access repeatbusinesssystems SBS2011 Scammers security security vulnerabilty Server 2008 Server 2008R2 Server Upgrade server virtualization Small Business Small Business Server 2011 smb Smishing SMS intercept Social Media Social Media Security Solid-State Drive stolen credentials Symantec Symantec Backup Exec technology best practices temperature Tips Two-Factor Authentication Upgrading to Windows 10 UPS virus Western New York Windows 10 Windows 7 Windows Server 2003 Windows Server 2012 winrar Work Computers