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Are you prepared to face a cybersecurity breach, a natural disaster or a system failure? Such disruptive events can strike at any moment, causing chaos and confusion.

But don’t worry. With an effective incident response plan in place, you can handle any incident with confidence.

This blog is intended to help you enhance your plan simply and straightforwardly. So, let’s dive in and make sure you’re ready for whatever comes your way.

 

Best Practices for Effective Incident Response Planning

To be well-prepared for any incident, it’s important to follow the steps below:

 

1. Identify and Prioritize Critical Data and Assets

Knowing precisely what resources you have helps you allocate them efficiently during an incident, saving time and minimizing overall damage. Threat modeling is a process used in cybersecurity that is beneficial in this regard. It involves identifying potential threats and vulnerabilities to an organization’s assets and systems.

 

2. Establish a Dedicated Team

A cohesive and well-trained team with clearly defined roles can work together to ensure an efficient and effective response.

 

3. Conduct Regular Trainings

Regular training helps keep your team informed of the latest techniques and threats, ensuring they can handle any situation with confidence. Our Breach Prevention Platform and Security Awareness Training that comes with simulated phishing tests that will train your employees in spotting real world threats.

 

4. Implement Continuous Monitoring 

Continuous monitoring systems can detect incidents early and take action before they escalate, potentially saving your organization from significant damage.

It is critical for any business to survive and thrive in today’s cybersecurity environment which is why Databranch provides a 24 x 7 proactive monitoring and alerting service for our managed clients. Visit us here to learn more and get started.

 

5. Establish Clear Communication Channels 

Clear communication channels within your team and with external stakeholders ensure that everyone is on the same page during the response, minimizing confusion and errors.

 

6. Develop a System to Categorize Incidents

Categorizing incidents based on their severity and impact ensures that you can respond appropriately to each incident, minimizing long-term damage to your organization.

 

How we can Help

All businesses today must have a solid incident response plan against ever-evolving cybersecurity threats. That’s where Databranch can be your strategic partner and your first line of defense against cyberstorms.

If you’re uncertain about how to approach incident response planning, we can help you in the following ways:

 

  • We’ll customize an incident response plan that aligns with your goals and challenges.
  • We’ll identify vulnerabilities and rank incident response planning through risk assessments.
  • We’ll help you build a fully equipped incident response team with clear roles.
  • We’ll suggest and apply advanced security technologies to boost your detection and responsibilities.
  • We’ll establish continuous monitoring to detect and respond to potential security incidents quickly.
  • We’ll ensure that your incident response plan complies with legal and regulatory requirements.
  • We’ll assist with post-incident analysis to refine response plans based on lessons learned.

 

Take Control of your Incident Response Plan

Don’t wait for a security breach to happen. Our team has years of experience and expertise to ensure the safety of your data. Take charge of your incident response plan now by contacting us at 716-373-4467 option 6, or [email protected] to schedule a no-obligation consultation with our team of experts.

You can also download our infographic to review the 4 stages of an incident response plan.

Your Essential Incident Response Plan

Don’t wait for a security breach to happen. Be proactive and plan your incident response now to address and mitigate potential threats effectively.

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Buyer beware – software programs or tools that claim the ability to conduct a risk assessment by scanning your network with little to no human interaction should raise concern!

These tools will generally do a nice job discovering vulnerabilities that exist in your technology environment, but vulnerabilities are not risks by default. 

Is you business familiar with vulnerability assessments and their benefits? If not, visit our website here to learn more about the benefits and how they can enhance your cybersecurity posture.

 

What is Needed

Risk requires the presence of a vulnerability PLUS the action of threat actor.

To illustrate this concept using an example from the tangible world, lets visualize a car. The car is parked, and the doors are unlocked. A premature conclusion would be to state that the doors being unlocked translates to risk. If you apply critical thought however, you will discover that the unlocked doors are simply a vulnerability that could be exploited.

You would need more information to determine actual risk. Is there anything valuable in the car? What is the crime rate associated with the place the car is parked? What would the impact be if someone gained access to the car? Who would attempt to gain access to the car? Are there other compensating controls in place, like a security camera? The same logic applies to the digital world.

The presence of vulnerabilities like unpatched computers or misconfigured devices will contribute to the likelihood of a risk event occurring, but it is shortsighted to say that vulnerabilities equal risk. That statement simply is not true.

A risk assessment requires critical thought to occur beyond the discovery of vulnerabilities by software tools. It requires critical thinking and the use of logic and reason. All of which made capable by the involvement of qualified human beings during the risk assessment process.

Relying on the arbitrary risk statements and scores created by software tools that simply discover vulnerabilities in your network, can lead to a false understanding of your actual risk profile. This can then easily lead to the wasteful allocations of resources – intended to reduce risk – but end up remediating a vulnerability instead.

 

What Happens After the Assessment?

Typically, a vulnerability assessment can be completed in a day or two. The results of a vulnerability assessment are documented and provided to the stakeholder complete with recommendations around remediating any weaknesses found.

Security shortcomings found during a vulnerability assessment can almost always be fixed. Many times, the fixes are very easy to accomplish. Roughly 60% of all reported cybersecurity breaches occurred because the bad actors exploited common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE).

This means that roughly 60% of all reported cybersecurity breaches could have been prevented if the victim had simply conducted a vulnerability assessment and made small improvements to their cybersecurity posture that would have eliminated a substantial amount of risk. 

Interested in setting up a vulnerability assessment? Contact Databranch today at 716-373-4467 x115, [email protected] , or fill in the form below to set up a meeting with one of our experienced team members.

Not only will we help with the assessment, but our team of highly trained engineers will help your business prioritize based on your specific business needs.

Request your free security risk consultation with a Databranch Security Expert here:

 

Content was provided courtesy of CyberStone.

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