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Managing a business on your own is challenging enough without worrying about cyberattacks. However, there is cause for alarm as hackers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to launch sophisticated cyberattacks to steal your data and disrupt business operations.

The good news is there are steps you can take to protect your business. This blog will explain how AI is being used in cybercrime and how you can safeguard your business.

 

How Hackers Use AI

Here are some of the ways cybercriminals are exploiting AI:

 

Deepfakes:

Hackers use AI to create highly realistic fake videos or audio recordings to impersonate someone you know, like your boss or a trusted friend. These deepfakes can be used to trick you into sending money or sharing sensitive information.

How to spot it: Closely look for details like unnatural facial movements or sloppy voice synchronization.

 

AI-Powered Password Cracking:

With the help of AI, cybercriminals can effortlessly crack common and easy passwords. Hackers with access to advanced computation offered by AI can automate the breaching process, so they can try millions of combinations to guess your password.

How to fight back: Always use unique passwords. Consider reaching out to Databranch to start the process of using a password manager.

 

AI-Assisted Hacking:

Hackers no longer have to spend hours looking for vulnerabilities. Instead, with the help of AI, they can create automated programs that not only identify weaknesses in your system but also create new types of malware.

How to stay ahead: Keep your security systems and software updated. Also, a mandate should be set up to scan for vulnerabilities routinely.

 

Supply Chain Attacks:

Threat actors use AI to insert malicious code into legitimate vendor products, which eventually will compromise your system as well. In a Business Email Compromise (BEC) instance, a hacker can also insert malicious content into reply chain emails coming from vendors vendors and suppliers

How to protect yourself: Only download software from trusted sources. Always be vigilant with updates, patches, and any email links.

 

Boost Your Defenses

AI-powered cybercrime is a growing threat. That’s why having Databranch by your side can be the ultimate weapon in your arsenal. Partner with us to leverage advanced technology to fortify your defenses. Download our checklist today to get started.

Reach out to us today at 716-373-4467 option 6, or [email protected] for a free consultation and learn how our team can secure your business against evolving cyber risks.

Cybercriminals are always looking for new ways to bypass security defenses. That’s why it’s essential to think like a hacker and adopt measures to stay ahead of them. This is what Defense in Depth (DiD) is all about.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defines DiD as “The application of multiple countermeasures in a layered or stepwise manner to achieve security objectives. The methodology involves layering heterogeneous security technologies in the common attack vectors to ensure that attacks missed by one technology are caught by another.”

In simple terms, DiD is a cybersecurity approach in which multiple defensive methods are layered to protect a business. Since no individual security measure can guarantee protection against every attack, combining several layers of security can be more effective.

Before you start your DiD journey, it’s crucial to stay informed about the changing threat landscape.

 

9 Threats to Protect Your Business Against

While there are numerous threats that businesses like yours must be aware of, let’s look at some of the most common.

 

 1. Ransomware 

Ransomware is a type of malware that threatens to disclose sensitive data or blocks access to files/systems by encrypting it until the victim pays a ransom. Failure to pay on time can lead to data leaks or permanent data loss.

 

2. Phishing/Business Email Compromise (BEC) 

Phishing involves a hacker masquerading as a genuine person/organization primarily through emails or other channels like SMS. Malicious actors use phishing to deliver links or attachments that execute actions such as extracting login credentials or installing malware.

Business email compromise (BEC) is a scam that involves cybercriminals using compromised or impersonated email accounts to manipulate victims into transferring money or sharing sensitive information.

 

3. Cloud Jacking

Cloud jacking, or hijacking, entails exploiting cloud vulnerabilities to steal an account holder’s information and gain server access. With more and more companies adopting cloud solutions, IT leaders are worried about cloud jacking becoming a significant concern for years to come.

 

4. Insider Threats 

An insider threat originates from within a business. It may happen because of current or former employees, vendors or other business partners who have access to sensitive business data. Because it originates from the inside and may or may not be premeditated, an insider threat is hard to detect.

 

5. Denial-of-Service/Distributed Denial-of-Service (DoS and DDoS)

These attacks are common and easy to carry out. In a DoS or DDoS attack, hackers flood the targeted system with multiple data requests, causing it to slow down or crash.

 

6. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) Hacks

Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) are trending topics within the IT world for their path-breaking applications. However, AI and ML help hackers more efficiently develop an in-depth understanding of how businesses guard against cyberattacks.

 

7. Internet of Things (IoT) Risks and Targeted Attacks

IoT devices are a favorite target of cybercriminals because of the ease of data sharing without human intervention and inadequate legislation.

 

8. Web Application Attacks

Vulnerabilities within web applications permit hackers to gain direct access to databases to manipulate sensitive data. Business databases are regular targets because they contain sensitive data, including Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and banking details.

 

9. Deepfakes

A deepfake is a cyberthreat that uses artificial intelligence to manipulate or generate audio/video content that can deceive end users into believing something untrue.

 

Get Up and Running with DiD

To keep sophisticated cyberthreats at bay, you need a robust DiD strategy. Your strategy should involve layering multiple defensive methods, like firewalls, intrusion prevention and detection systems, endpoint detection and response (EDR) and more, to build a security fortress that’s hard to crack.

DiD is an undertaking that requires time and effort. That’s why collaborating with a partner like Databranch, who can implement and maintain your DiD strategy while you focus on your business, is ideal.

If you want to learn more about how DiD can help protect your business, download our free eBook “7 Elements of an Effective Defense in Depth (DiD) Security Strategy.”

You can also reach out to one of our experienced team members at 716-373-4467 option 6, or [email protected].

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